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Dharma Teachers
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Debra Chamberlin-Taylor
Debra Chamberlin-Taylor is a teacher at Spirit Rock Meditation Center. She has been meditating since 1973 and has led retreats that combine spiritual and psychological growth since 1978. In addition to practicing Vipassana, she has been influenced by Dzogchen, Diamond Heart, and devotional practices. More recently she has become a certified teacher of Wisdom Healing Qigong, finding Qigong and mindfulness used together to be the most healing and transformative practice in her long spiritual journey. A psychotherapist, she also leads workshops on embodiment of awareness and love in relationships and in our diverse world.

Dhammaruwan

Diana Winston
My passions in the dharma are many, and only keep growing! Socially engaged Buddhism is a thread woven through many of my talks-- how can we end suffering both internally and externally? Having worked with teens and young adults for many years, some of the talks are geared to young people. My recent passion is how the dharma can be secularized and made accessible to all, regardless of background, this is my current work at the Mindful Awareness Research Center at UCLA. Finally as a new-ish mom, I'm deeply inspired by the transformative power of daily life and family practice. www.marc.ucla.edu

Dipa Ma
1. Choose one meditation practice and stick with it. If you want to progress in meditation stay with one technique. 2. Meditate every day. Practice now. Don't think you will do more later. 3. Any situation is workable. Each of us has enormous power. It can be used to help ourselves and help others. 4. Practice patience. Patience is one of the most important virtues for developing mindfulness and concentration. 5. Free your mind. Your mind is all stories. 6. Cool the fire of emotions. Anger is a fire. 7. Have fun along the way. I am quite happy. If you come to meditate you will also be happy. 8. Simplify. Live simply. A very simple life is good for every thing. Too much luxury is a hindrance to practice. 9. Cultivate the spirit of blessing. If you bless those around you this will inspire you to be attentive in every moment. 10. It's a circular journey. Meditation integrates the whole person

Donald Rothberg
Donald Rothberg, PhD, has practiced Insight Meditation since 1976, and has also received training in Tibetan Dzogchen and Mahamudra practice and the Hakomi approach to body-based psychotherapy. Formerly on the faculties of the University of Kentucky, Kenyon College, and Saybrook Graduate School, he currently writes and teaches classes, groups and retreats on meditation, daily life practice, spirituality and psychology, and socially engaged Buddhism. An organizer, teacher, and former board member for the Buddhist Peace Fellowship, Donald has helped to guide three six-month to two-year training programs in socially engaged spirituality through Buddhist Peace Fellowship (the BASE Program), Saybrook (the Socially Engaged Spirituality Program), and Spirit Rock (the Path of Engagement Program). He is the author of The Engaged Spiritual Life: A Buddhist Approach to Transforming Ourselves and the World and the co-editor of Ken Wilber in Dialogue: Conversations with Leading Transpersonal Thinkers.

Doreen Schweizer

Dori Langevin

Doug Phillips
Doug is founder and guiding teacher of Empty Sky Vipasssa Sangha and a long time practioner of vipassana and zen. His teaching is strongly influenced by Vimala Thakar and J. Krishnamurti as he explores such questions as "After all these years of practice, why are we not free?" and "What happens that we do not immediately live the understanding we work so hard to gain, continuing to cling to the false when seeing clearly what is true?" He brings a strong committment and interest to the integration of formal practice and intimacy in relationship in the context of daily living.

Dr Thynn Thynn

Dr. Ariyaratne

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