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Sally Clough Armstrong's Dharma Talks
Sally Clough Armstrong
Sally Clough Armstrong began practicing vipassana meditation in India in 1981. She moved to the Bay Area in 1988, and worked at Spirit Rock until 1994 in a number of roles, including executive director. She began teaching in 1996, and is one of the guiding teachers of Spirit Rock's Dedicated Practitioner Program.
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2019-02-24 The Four Noble Truths (Retreat at Spirit Rock) 57:35
The Buddha taught the Four Noble Truths – the truths of suffering, the cause of suffering , the end of suffering and the path to the end of suffering – not as a philosophy, but as practices that we can use here and now to understand why we suffer and how to find release. Using this template to gain insight into our lives can bring a radical shift to the way we relate to our experience.
Spirit Rock Meditation Center February Monthlong
2019-02-17 The Seven Factors of Awakening (Retreat at Spirit Rock) 57:41
The seven factors of awakening develop and strengthen naturally as we practice, but knowing this map helps us incline towards them.
Spirit Rock Meditation Center February Monthlong
2019-02-17 Day 15 Guided Meditation (Retreat at Spirit Rock) 47:47
Last Day of Morning Instructions
Spirit Rock Meditation Center February Monthlong
2019-02-12 Day 10 Brahma Vihara Guided Meditation - Metta for the Difficult Person (Retreat at Spirit Rock) 45:37
Spirit Rock Meditation Center February Monthlong
2019-02-11 Judging, Fixing & Comparing (Retreat at Spirit Rock) 59:45
Spirit Rock Meditation Center February Monthlong
2019-02-10 Day 8 - Morning Sit w/ Instructions - Mindfulness of the Mind 52:52
Spirit Rock Meditation Center February Monthlong
2019-02-07 Day 5 Sit with Morning Instructions (Retreat at Spirit Rock) 42:13
Spirit Rock Meditation Center February Monthlong
2019-02-04 A Venn Diagram of Practice(Retreat at Spirit Rock) 57:33
As we begin the journey of a long retreat, it is helpful to consider different ways to frame our practice .I offered an overview with a diagram that depicted this, and how we might talk about our practice in meetings with teachers. This begins with the biggest frame - wise attitude or wise view, supported by our intentions and aspirations. the next frame is continuity of mindfulness that supports whatever practice or technique we might be cultivating.
Spirit Rock Meditation Center February Monthlong
2018-10-11 Supports for Steadying the mind: The Jhana Factors 59:55
There are five factors that are supported for deepening concentration, known as the jhana factors. These factors are developed in any kind of intensive meditation practice but are particularly supportive of the development of samadhi. They also serve to counterbalance the hindrances. When the hindrances are not active, the mind and heart can be
Insight Meditation Society - Retreat Center Three-Month Retreat - Part 1
2018-09-27 3 Kinds of Intention 58:57
3 Kinds of Intention To develop any skill, to fully cultivate any qualities in our lives, particularly on the Buddhist path, we need to engage with three kinds of intention that operate on different time frames. Cetana is the moment-to-moment intention, the urge to do, that we can bring into the field of our mindfulness practice. The next level, Adhitthana, is usually translated as resolve or determination and is one of the paramis. The highest level is Samma Sankappa, right or wise intention. This is the second path factor, after right view, so it is the kind of intention developed by right view. There are three kinds of Right intention - the intention towards renunciation, non-ill will, and non-harming. These skillful intentions can then inform our choices and actions (Adhitthanas), which we keep in mind through awareness of moment-to-moment intentions, or cetana.
Insight Meditation Society - Retreat Center Three-Month Retreat - Part 1

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