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Dharma Talks
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2022-03-28 Open, Spacious Awareness Meditation | Monday Night 27:27
Jack Kornfield
Reflect on the value of a peaceful heart. What is it like to have a peaceful heart among the worldly winds of praise and blame, gain and loss, pleasure and pain, joy and sorrow, fame and disrepute. These are the worldly winds that constantly change. It's important to stop, take a pause, and feel that we are part of something so much greater than the individual life that we live. Our awareness is big enough to hold all of this, because we are awareness itself.
Spirit Rock Meditation Center Monday and Wednesday Talks

2021-08-04 Deepening Daily Life Practice 4: Practicing with the Eight Worldly Winds 2 69:42
Donald Rothberg
We begin by naming some of the important supports for daily life practice and by exploring further the importance of practicing with reactivity (compulsively and habitually grasping after or pushing away). It's helpful to focus on the center of practice: Transforming reactivity and learning better how to respond skillfully in all parts of our lives. It's also important to name some of the complexities of practicing with reactivity: (1) Seeing that the pleasant and unpleasant aren't the problem, that reactivity is the problem; (2) understanding that this isn't about passivity but rather about skillful response; and (3) clarifying that reactivity can often be enmeshed with important insight, clarity, and intelligence, such that the aim of practice is to separate out the reactivity from the insight. In this context, we then look further at the Eight Worldly Winds (pleasure or pain, gain or loss, fame or disrepute, and praise or blame) and point to a number of guidelines and suggestions for practicing when they arise.
Spirit Rock Meditation Center Monday and Wednesday Talks

2021-08-04 Guided Meditation: Practicing with the Eight Worldly Winds 2 37:38
Donald Rothberg
After some general instructions for settling and seeing clearly and a period of practice, there is guidance for practicing with the Eight Worldly Winds (pleasure or pain, gain or loss, fame or disrepute, and praise or blame). We focus first on being attentive to moderate or greater levels of pleasant or unpleasant experiences (when the experiences are in the "workable" range). Then we bring in attention to the other Winds, when they arise.
Spirit Rock Meditation Center Monday and Wednesday Talks

2021-07-28 Deepening Daily Life Practice 3: Practicing with the Eight Worldly Winds 68:43
Donald Rothberg
We begin with a review of the last two sessions related to deepening daily life practice, including identifying some of the challenges of contemporary daily life practice and some basic ways of deepening such practice, the importance for such practice of mindfulness of the body, and the centrality of practicing with reactivity (based on looking closely at the sequence from contact to grasping or pushing away). We then, for the rest of the session, explore the teaching of the Eight Worldly Winds (pleasure or pain, gain or loss, fame or disrepute, and praise or blame) as a way of looking out for eight specific experiences that are likely to lead to reactivity. In all of this, we focus on how we might learn from and respond skillfully to such challenging situations rather than simply react in a largely unconscious and habitual way. The talk is followed by a discussion.
Spirit Rock Meditation Center Monday and Wednesday Talks

2021-07-28 Deepening Daily Life Practice 3: A Guided Meditation: Settling, Practicing with Pleasant and Unpleasant and Tendencies to Reactivity, Practicing with the Eight Worldly Winds 37:48
Donald Rothberg
In this guided meditation, we start with about 10 minutes of settling. We then attend to when there is a moderate or greater pleasant or unpleasant feeling-tone, bringing some investigation as to what occurs in ones' experience, including tendencies to reactivity (grasping or pushing away). Toward the end of the guided meditation, there's an invitation to track for those forms of reactivity coming after one of the Eight Worldly Winds (pleasure or pain, gain or loss, fame or disrepute, and praise or blame).
Spirit Rock Meditation Center Monday and Wednesday Talks

2020-10-08 Cultivating Equanimity 41:15
Donald Rothberg
We examine both the nature of equanimity and how to develop more equanimity, both in formal meditation and in the flow of our lives, including in the context of multiple contemporary crises. Equanimity has qualities of balance, evenness, unshakability, understanding and wisdom, faith, joy, and responsiveness. It can be cultivated in our basic mindfulness practice, as we develop more balance, particularly by learning from tends to unbalance us, including difficult emotions, thoughts, and body-states. We can also particularly focus on the teaching of the "Eight Worldly Winds" (or Conditions): pleasure and pain, gain and loss, fame and disrepute, praise and blame.
Insight Meditation Tucson

2019-07-15 Day 5 Brahma Vihara Practice: Equanimity (Retreat at Spirit Rock) - Starting the Equanimity Meditation 62:10
Tempel Smith
Taking the most wisdom to access, the Equanimity Brahma Vihara practice gets is strength from a brave willingness to intimately see all truths. If we suspend out preferences for health and happiness, and away from pain and sorrow, we can bring our loving hearts in direct contact with what we see if true. Life is an ever changing and uncontrollable mix of gain and loss, pleasure and pain, and praise and blame. When we can rest in Equanimity Brahma Vihara we can hold all truths at the same time in one space of heart.
Spirit Rock Meditation Center July Metta Retreat

2018-08-08 Practicing with Difficulties and Challenges 2: The Eight Worldly Winds 63:20
Donald Rothberg
After a review of the six ways of practicing with difficulties and challenges presented last week, we explore the important teaching of the “Eight Worldly Winds” that keep us caught in reactivity—pleasure and pain, gain and loss, fame and disrepute, and praise and blame. Working with this teaching gives us another very helpful lens for working with difficulties and also with our tendencies to grasp—onto pleasure, gain, fame, and praise. We suggest several ways of practicing with this teaching, as a further way to deepen and energize our practice.
Spirit Rock Meditation Center

2016-08-14 39 guided meditation: Equanimity for oneself 25:52
Jill Shepherd
Exploring equanimity for oneself through a brief life review, touching into impermanence and the eight worldly winds of pleasure/pain, gain/loss, praise/blame, fame/infamy
Blue Mountains Insight Meditation Centre Nine-day insight meditation retreat led by Jill Shepherd

2012-10-04 No Credit, No Blame. 56:40
James Baraz
"In this world no one escapes from blame," said the Buddha. How can we deal with blame from others skillfully without getting crushed by criticism or react to it in a way that causes more suffering for ourselves and other? The key to not being lost in Praise or Blame is non-identification, not taking ownership of your experience. This includes not identifying with your body or mind. We can appreciate the gifts we've been given as well as our shortcomings without taking them personally. This is the natural by-product of understanding anatta, the selfless nature of existence.
Insight Meditation Community of Berkeley IMCB Regular Talks

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